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This elected Boston Councillor accepts help from people who believe the rent is too damn high!

Earlier this week, Smallwall Writer asked you to respond to an effort to restrict AirBnB apartment rental volume in the City of Boston. Then we wrote a letter to the movement leadership. ( Photo of small house adapted a Boston Globe article.)

We heard back a day after.

This is the letter we received.

#

From Councilor Tim McCarthy

timothy.mccarthy@boston.gov

The issue of short term rentals is an incredibly complex issue that will have many years of positive or negative impacts on the City of Boston. I will continue to work with the administration and my colleagues in order to get a solid ordinance that addresses this issue.

I appreciate your email and your advocacy.

Tim McCarthy

District 5 City Councilor

Boston City Hall- 5th Floor

Boston, MA 02201

617-635-4210

@mccarthy4boston

What you see out your front door- is important to us!

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Send corporate AirBnB raiders this letter today. It helps put more rental apts back on the market.

a dollar for an idea

When a 170-unit apartment building opened. In Jamaica Plain, a corporation scooped up 24 units at full rent. They loaded in furniture and began renting to short-term users for $210 per day.

When a West coast city passed a rule banning this practice, thousands of apartments came back on the market overnight.

You can help stop the raids in Boston.

Email the letter below

to: citycouncilstr@adco.boston

Adco Boston is the campaign

to stop corporate AirBnB

**********************
TO: Boston City Council Members:

I am writing to support the Mayor’s Ordinance on Short-Term Residential Rentals in the City of Boston.

The elimination of the Investor Unit category will preserve housing opportunities for our residents and better ensure the mitigation of potentially significant negative impacts on our downtown neighborhoods.

I urge Councilors to vote ‘yes’ on the Mayor’s ordinance.

Thank you,

Your name
Your address in Boston
*******************
END OF MESSAGE

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HUD gives $1.2Million to renew support for 32 HIV-AID housing programs via Gloucesters’s Action, Inc

Programs to support people in need of affordable housing who have HIV-AID received $32 million from HUD in December 2017 across the United States.

$1.2 million of the round went to Massachusetts firm Action, Inc. https://actioninc.org/ to support the 32 HIV-AIDS housing programs in their portfolio.

Action Inc receives millions in awards to assist disadvantaged individuals.

Learn more from HUD at https://www.hud.gov/press/press_releases_media_advisories/2017/HUDNo_17-118

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How to get hundreds of dollars added to Section 8 housing vouchers in Boston.

a dollar for an idea

” [ How to Get More Dollars Added to a Section 8 Housing Voucher to Cover Rising Boston Rents ] ”  is a better title  for the how-to article on WGBH’s web site..  T

But the article was  titled “Boston’s Poor Forced To Find 2017 Apartments At 2005 Rental Rates,” posted December 12, 2017 written by BIANCA VAZQUEZ TONESS of WGBH News, and  posted at this link   https://news.wgbh.org/2017/12/12/

Be sure to read it and learn the trick.

Why should they have to ask for this increase?

This problem is caused by elected officials in Massachusetts government. Policy makes a difference.  When they don’t get it right, it is a #FAIL.  Politics is the control of a limited amount of fixed resources.

The article says …  “xtremely hard,” said 35-year-old Ashesha Rockette.”

Rockette receives a state housing voucher that helps subsidize her rent. She is required to pay a third of her monthly income — $211 — toward the rent while the state kicks in the rest.

excerpt: The state’s Department of Housing and Community Development would not comment on the funding levels for the voucher program.

The state slashed the budget in the 1990s. Over the last few years, they’ve restored some funding, but that’s gone to increasing the number of vouchers, not the subsidy amount.

excerpt: At 2005 rates, you may also struggle to find a safe, working apartment that meets state housing standards, said Rockette. When Rockette eventually found a place in Hyde Park for $1,650, it was far from perfect. Last week, the water was turned off. There’s mold, and rodents. Her mailbox has never locked properly, so she misses important mail.

excerpt:  Two years ago, that meant the state was paying the difference between her third and a cap of $1,392 — the maximum amount she could spend on rent. Rockette was not able to find an apartment at that rate. She eventually negotiated a better deal with the state, but many people who rely on these vouchers are still locked into the cap, which was set back in 2005.


HEADLINE:  Dec 12, 2017,

Governor Baker announce a plan for 135,000 new housing units by year 2025

http://www.wbur.org/bostonomix/2017/12/11/bakler-new-housing-plan

In May 2016, the governor announced $1.1 Billion for housing investment in Massachusetts. Where is the happy ending to the story?

When policy makers in government allocate billions of dollars to cover necessary expenses, there is negotiation. Do you build more housing the less fortunate can afford? Do  you fix rusty bridges, replace underground the water pipes, cover cost of free insurance for  poor people? Do you build a new highway?

What do you do with fixed amount of money?

The answer never pleases everybody.

 

 

 

 

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Subsidized restricted income rental housing you won’t find anywhere else

Rural America

re: 51 Subsidized Properties and APPLICATIONS NOT AVAILABLE ANYWHERE

We’ve heard that agencies serving rural parts of the state have  great affordable housing opportunities, now here is proof. This info comes to us from a database source that has the applications you can file.

This December 12 2017 report 
shows listings for subsidized housing where you pay 30% income for rent anywhere within 100 miles of Brookline, MA.  The status of the addresses are listed, however you’ll have to contact the individual locations for the latest status.

Housingworks  says you WON’T FIND certain subsidized buildings or applications if you look in the MassHousing ‘White Book’, apply to a Housing Authority, or use MassAccess.

(They are financed by the US Dept. of Agriculture (!) and are situated in smaller towns rather than big cities. The wait for some of these is shorter than the wait for properties in big cities.)

These properties are about 60%  for elders and persons with disability of any age, and 40% properties for families. Some have a priority for Veterans, but most are just first come first serve.